Treatment Massage

The Injury and Pain Relief Clinic

Back to real physiology for this entry instead of psychology. :)

The flu or common cold has been around for a very long time, and each fall and winter season they really seem to hit us hard. The problem is compounded if you have small children in a daycare or school situation... bringing home every version to share with you in the form of a nice hug or kiss. And I'm sure you have tried most cures or symptom reducers on the drugstore shelf, and you probably have your favorite... but let me share something that I just learned recently.

I was traveling home from work one day in mid-September listening to NPR's fresh air program, and they were interviewing Jennifer Ackerman. She is the author of a book called "Ah-Choo! The Uncommon Life of Your Common Cold." The interview was interesting, and timely (with flu season right around the corner), and so I paid attention.

What it all seems to boil down to is that we are going to get the flu, and that is just the way it is. However, we can mitigate much of the symptoms. Here is a quote the important information regarding feeling better while having the flu...

"The advice that I heed is advocated by Jack Gwaltney, who studied the common cold for 40 years, and he's arguably one of the world's foremost experts.

And what he recommends is taking two single-ingredient drugs every 12 hours. And you start at the earliest sign of a cold, that sort of scratchy throat, and you continue until your symptoms are clear.

And the two drugs that he suggests taking are, first, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug like ibuprofen or naproxen, something like that. Then that helps to ease your, that sense of malaise and cough and sore throat.

And he also suggests taking an antihistamine. And the one that he suggests is the older, they're called first-generation antihistamines, the kind that make you drowsy like Benadryl or Chlor-Trimeton. These are the sedating types of antihistamines. And those will help relieve runny nose and sneezing.

It's important to note that the newer antihistamines, such as Claritin, which are really designed for allergies, do not have this beneficial effect on the cold.

But taking those two drugs, the anti-inflammatory drug, you know, most of us know them as pain relievers, and these older antihistamines, it will ease your symptoms. And also, it limits the buildup of nasal fluid, which can actually lead to secondary infections. If you have too much nasal fluid, sinusitis is a very common complication."

I have since had the chance to try this treatment, and in my opinion it really helps a lot... much better than any other cold remedy. So until I find something better, I'm sticking with this protocol.

If you are interested in listening to the interview, or reading a transcript, you can find it at NPR's website here: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129829134&ft=1&f=100876926

Enjoy!

Mark Pearlscott, LMP

Providing massage therapy for pain problems. Located in Seattle, WA near the University of Washington.

All material copyright 1999 - 2017
by Mark Pearlscott and Treatment Massage.

Treatment Massage - The Injury and Pain Relief Clinic
4500 9th Avenue NE, Suite 300
Seattle, WA 98105
All material copyright 1999 - 2017
by Mark Pearlscott and Treatment Massage.

Treatment Massage - The Injury and Pain Relief Clinic
4500 9th Avenue NE, Suite 300
Seattle, WA 98105